Electronic Health Records

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Breaking Down the Health IT Impacts of Stage 3 Meaningful Use

By Jennifer Bresnick

- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its proposed rule for Stage 3 meaningful use on March 20, revealing the hotly anticipated provisions for the final phase of the EHR Incentive Programs.

Raising the bar on some of the toughest aspects of Stage 2 while requiring healthcare providers to make some significant leaps in EHR adoption and care delivery by 2018, the Stage 3 meaningful use framework poses some difficult questions for eligible providers and hospitals struggling with interoperability and the burdens of leveraging EHRs for patient care.

From health IT interoperability to privacy and security to big data analytics, the impacts of Stage 3 will touch nearly every aspect of the healthcare industry in the next few years.

What are some of the key issues providers must keep in mind as 2018 approaches and the EHR Incentive Programs eventually come to an end?

Top 8 goals of the Stage 3 meaningful use proposed rule

The objectives and thresholds in Stage 3 urge providers to new heights in patient care by encouraging more extensive use of health information exchange, e-prescribing, clinical decision support, and computerized provider order entry (CPOE).  CMS also hopes to increase patient engagement substantially over Stage 2 levels and promote the coordination of care through expanding access to personal health information.  Read a summary of the eight major objectives included in CMS’ plan for the industry.

Interoperability key to Stage 3 meaningful use requirements

Industry-wide EHR interoperability is the ultimate goal of the EHR Incentive Programs, and Stage 3 hopes to bring providers closer to widespread health information exchange than ever before.  “The flow of information is fundamental” to better care, healthier patients, and reduced costs, says HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell, but the path towards meaningful interoperability has been a difficult one.  Stage 3 intends to address some of the major barriers to interoperability by raising thresholds and benchmarks for health information exchange.

Can Stage 3 meaningful use CEHRT bring on big data analytics?

Stage 3 brings some major changes to the way EHR technology is certified and designed in accordance with the EHR Incentive Programs’ growing emphasis on healthcare analytics and population health management.  With the newly-named “health IT modules” presenting opportunities and challenges for providers seeking to gear up for the optional 2015 Edition Certified EHR Technology (CEHRT) criteria, how will the new provisions for EHR development allow the technology evolve into meaningful tools for big data analytics and effective care coordination?

How does Stage 3 meaningful use affect health data privacy?

As CMS turns its attention to interoperability and increased data exchange, patient privacy and security measures will become ever more important to the industry.  Continued confusion over meaningful use and the HIPAA Security Rule has left many providers asking questions about how they can protect their patients’ electronic personal health information (ePHI) in the face of data breach after data breach.  Learn how Stage 3 hopes to simplify patient data privacy and security measures for providers in this breakdown of the Stage 3 proposal from HealthITSecurity.com.

What does the Stage 3 meaningful use rule mean for analytics?

How will Stage 3 build on existing infrastructure to encourage healthcare analytics to thrive?  By leveling the playing field and requiring providers to meet all the same measures in 2018.  This controversial proposal may leave some lagging organizations in the lurch, but with the help of the ONC’s Common Clinical Data Set, it would create rich opportunities for informaticist and population health managers.  Will Stage 3 be the push the industry needs to expand its budding analytics capabilities?

ONC proposes 2015 health IT certification criteria rules

The 2015 CEHRT criteria, released in conjunction with the Stage 3 rule, have significant implications for healthcare privacy and security.  By opening up the certification program to include new types of health IT, and therefore new types of patient data, the ONC plans to achieve widespread interoperability.  How will federal rule makers ensure that personal health information is sufficiently protected without overburdening providers and EHR developers?

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